Yes or No: Are Video Games Art?

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In the computer and video game hobby circle, there are many existential questions that have always occupied a group of individual fans and players: which is the best console? Can I play first-person shooters seriously with my controller? Which publisher does the community hate most? NVIDIA or AMD?

All of these questions are becoming more or less talked about, but on the surface, they remain fairly constant, and there is one question that has been raised many times over the decades. Question not completely answered to date: Is video games art? Of course, everyone, including me, wants to shout, “Of course, it’s out of the question!” Impulsive at first, some disagree with refusing to classify video games as media.

Is it art or can it disappear?

The reason most of us instinctively agree that video games are art is probably that art is considered a purely creative process. Someone creates something with his creativity, and the result is art. And that’s a very clear reason. Game development itself is more than a creative process where the world is created, characters are designed, websites are created (see inversegamer.com), and ideas of all kinds are realized.

But when it comes to the concept of art, it’s not that simple, as many experts differ in a very important way. For example, as in the case of video games, the subject to passive contemplation is what visual art is, not concrete content. When you look at paintings, even music and movies are sometimes considered art, but rarely on PCs and video games.

Why games are art

We can devote ourselves to all kinds of definitions and listen to the pros and cons of important personalities, but ultimately what matters to most of us is purely subjective. It’s a feeling. Answer “yes” directly or deal with “no”, but deal with “yes”.

If you ask, the majority of gamers now see their hobby as a kind of art. Some games that end up in a more artistic direction than other titles agree with this view.

Why is it important?

Well, one of the people who read this special may have asked exactly this question. Why do gamers need to care when our hobby is officially considered art? It’s enough if we all agree with that, right? Again, this is not generally the case. Apart from the fact that it is always great when something is officially or culturally approved, other factors are involved.

One of them has a very specific impact on the player. This is a tedious topic for indexed games. anti-constitutional symbols such as swastikas may appear on movies and television under certain conditions, which is always prohibited on computers and video games.